Wholesome life: UV security for the summer season

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Healthy life: UV safety for the summer

After breaking records with three-digit temperatures here in Washington, doctors are now warning against too much sun exposure.

After breaking records with three-digit temperatures here in Washington, doctors are now warning against too much sun exposure.

We also learn that it doesn’t take much to develop skin cancer. Doctors say it only takes five bad burns to significantly increase the risk of melanoma.

There are other risk factors that could help you better understand how to prevent this from happening.

As much as we want to soak up the picturesque summer in the Pacific Northwest – the Senior Executive Medical Director at Regence Dr. Drew Oliveira says protection is key.

“Wear a large hat, a large hat with a wide brim, to protect your face from the sun,” says Dr. Oliveira.

He says put on those sunglasses, wear protective clothing, put on sunscreen, and reapply it every two hours.

“What we are most concerned about is skin cancer,” he says. “Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in younger age groups and the leading cause of cancer in younger women. It is the second leading cause of cancer in women between the ages of 30 and 35.”

Here are the people most at risk: People with fair skin, green or blue eyes, or freckles Even those who have a history of cancer or chronic illness.

So what to look out for: Birthmarks – their size, shape, color, and diameter are all important in detecting cancer.

“Is it asymmetrical, isn’t it round?” he says. “What does the edge look like? Is it regular or smooth? C stands for color. Has the color changed or is it very dark? “

Dr. Oliveira says if the birthmark changes or appears more, this is your cue to call your doctor.

He says the survival rate for early melanoma is close to 100%. If you catch it too late, it can be pretty devastating.

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