Particular Olympics MD athlete teaches individuals about wholesome residing

The Special Olympics are just around the corner and the health of all athletes is just as important as the competition itself. An athlete teaches fellow campaigners the benefits of eating a healthy diet high in vegetables and fruits, that way they stay engaged with the participation practices and qualifying games, “said David Godoy, an athlete from Special Olympics Maryland. Godoy knows what it is better than anyone needs to be a healthy athlete at the Special Olympics Maryland. He has competed in various sports for 17 years and is a top athlete and trained athlete health messenger. Godoy recently made a zoom call for healthy eating athletes It was something to avoid because it’s not healthy at all, so they put some slides in the PowerPoint presentation and the athletes made some choices, “said Godoy al Olympics Maryland, people with intellectual disabilities get an inferior Supply or virtually no health care, for every 10 athletes en on a Special Olympics team: Two have never had an eye exam Two have possible hearing loss Four have untreated tooth decay Two to three have low bone density Six are overweight or obese Five have at least one type of skin or nail disease “Interesting is over the course of the year Years that people with disabilities have been marginalized at every point in their lives, including health care. And what is interesting is that some of them are due to a lack of training by the practitioners, others to ignorance and inability to communicate, “said Jim Schmutz, President and CEO of Special Olympics Maryland. But Special Olympics Maryland changes that narrative. They have a healthy lifestyle and taught the importance of athletics. Last year they had to cancel the Summer Games due to the coronavirus pandemic. But this weekend they are back – and the athletes are working to stay healthier and happier than ever. “It gives me happiness and satisfaction. When I can do it, all athletes can do it themselves, “said Godoy. The Special Olympics Maryland Summer Games still need volunteers. Click here to register.”

The Special Olympics are just around the corner and the health of all athletes is just as important as the competition itself.

An athlete educates his competitors about the benefits of a healthy diet.

“That way, by staying healthy, drinking plenty of water, and eating plenty of vegetables and fruits, you will stay engaged with the participation practices and qualifying games,” said David Godoy, an athlete with Special Olympics Maryland.

Godoy knows better than anyone what it takes to be a healthy athlete at the Maryland Special Olympics.

He has been active in various sports for 17 years and is a top athlete and a trained health ambassador for athletes.

Godoy recently launched a Zoom Call for the athletes on healthy eating.

“We showed a PowerPoint presentation about the different food options, for example at McDonalds. It was something to avoid because it is not healthy at all,” said Godoy.

According to Special Olympics Maryland, people with intellectual disabilities receive inadequate or virtually no health care.

For every 10 athletes of a Special Olympics Team:

  • Two of them have never had an eye exam
  • Two have possible hearing loss
  • Four have untreated tooth decay
  • Two to three have low bone density
  • Six are overweight or obese
  • Five have at least one type of skin or nail condition

“What is interesting is that over the years people with disabilities have been marginalized at every point in their lives, and that includes healthcare and inability to communicate,” said Jim Schmutz, president and CEO of Special Olympics Maryland.

But Special Olympics Maryland changes that narrative.

For 50 years they have been teaching a healthy lifestyle and the importance of athletics.

Last year they had to cancel the summer games because of the coronavirus pandemic. But they’re back this weekend – and the athletes are working to stay healthier and happier than ever.

“It gives me happiness and satisfaction. If I can do it, all athletes can do it themselves,” said Godoy.

The Special Olympics Maryland Summer Games still need volunteers. Click here to login.

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